Stress Heart Risks: New Studies Show How Stress Affects Cardiovascular Health

Stress can make your hair fall out and cause you to lose sleep, and it can also seriously impact your cardiovascular health. According to a recent article in the Huffington Post, there is new research about the impact stress has on cardiovascular health.

According to one study, elderly with elevated cortisol levels over a period of time were more likely to be at risk for cardiovascular disease, and they also were more likely to have a history of stroke, diabetes, peripheral arterial disease, and coronary heart disease. Dr ElisabethVan Rossum stated that “the data showed a clear link between chronically elevated cortisol levels and cardiovascular disease”.

 “In a very stressful situation [like unemployment], you can actually get a severe release of adrenaline and sympathetic nerve discharges that cause the heart to beat irregularly,” said John Higgins, MD, a sports cardiologist at the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston.

Proof again that stress is bad. Are you burned out? Contact us to find out about our 14-Day Stress-Bursting Challenge. Your mind and body will thank you!

10 New Things We’ve Learned About Stress

April marks the beginning of National Stress Awareness Month. Huffington Post shared a recent article outlining 10 new things we’ve learned about stress.

1) According to recent studies, work stress may lead to increased risk of cardiac complications in men, diabetes in women and it may also shorten DNA strands linked to longevity.

2) A genuine smile lowers your heart rate and alleviates stress. So next time you are in traffic, try smiling even if you have to fake it in the beginning. Haha!

3) Dwelling on stress can make matters worse. That’s right your reaction to stress impacts your physical health.

4) Chronic stress puts men at increased risk for diabetes.

5) Work issues and job stability are biggest contributers to milennial stress.

6) Learning to be present (using techniques such as art therapy and mindfulness meditation) helps alleviate stress and improve health.

7) Stress plays a role in drug relapse. Personally, we don’t think this is anything new but glad it’s getting attention. It’s important not to turn to drugs/alcohol (i.e. self-medicate) when under stress.

8) Stress impacts the body’s ability to regulate inflammation which in turn lowers immunity and places a person at risk for catching a cold.

9) Stillbirths are 2.5% higher in women with major stressful life events.

10) Also, according to researcher bring your clean, friendly, pet to work could also help alleviate stress. Of course, if you cannot take your pet to work then spends some time regularly playing with your beloved pet.

Stress in contagious! Avoid secondhand stress by following our blog and utilizing our
stress-management services.

 

4 steps to prevent burnout

There is so much information out there about the negative impacts stress has on one’s health. From put your at risk for heart disease to impacting your sleep. Stress can do a number on your body. What can you do to prevent burning out?

Just like anyone is, Elika is under a lot of stress. Stress from multiple obligations and various deadlines. In fact, lately, Elika’s sleep was impacted by her stress and she began to notice the signs that her body is under too much stress.

Here is Elika’s 4 step burnout prevention prescription:
1) Identify what is causing worry/stress in your life.
2) Is it something you are not doing that needs to be done? If so, schedule some time in your calender now to make sure it gets done.
3) Establish appropriate boundaries to prevent those pesky “time thieves”.
4) Make sure to get adequate rest. Lack of sleep is also a stressor on the body.

Need some help getting through the rough patch? We are just a call/click away.

Did you try these steps? What was your experience?

3 things you can do at home to manage your stress

Center for Healthy and Happy Living’s Founder, Elika Kormeili, appreciates how hard we all work. She also knows that our physical health and our emotional (and mental health) are connected. In order to be truly healthy and happy we need to take care of both our physical health (i.e. make sure you go for an annual check up and follow doctor recommendations) and our mental health or emotional health (i.e. developing a prevention plan).

Last week, we wrote about how to manage stress at work. Here are a few tips you can use NOW to manage stress at home.
1) Develop a ritual. Incorporate a relaxation technique into your bedtime routine in order to prevent stress. I will be posting some “how to videos” on this soon.

2) Declutter your home. From a psychological point of view, a messy environment, adds to our sense of emotional chaos.

3) Get enough rest. It sounds really simple, but so many adults suffer from insomnia. Stress can lead to poor sleep and poor sleep and become an added stressor. If sleep is an issue, get support!

Is worrying keeping you up at night? Need help learning a relaxation technique?

Stress Impacts Everyone’s Health

At Center for Healthy and Happy Living, we understand the importance of managing stress. Not only does stress put us in a bad mood and make us “grumpy” but it also impacts our physical health. Stress is the body’s response to a change that requires a physical, mental or emotional adjustment. The trigger or “stressor” could be good (getting married, having a child) or it could be bad (illness, death of a loved one, divorce, etc).

How stress impacts women’s health:

Stress is often a key culprit when women experience menstruation problems. Hormonal problems are a big stressor for women. We can ponder which came first, stress or hormonal problems but the truth is that hormonal problems are a physical stressor which may (and often do) lead to emotional stress.

  • Heart disease is the number one killer of American women. High blood pressure, heart attacks, heart palpitations, and stroke may be stress related cardiovascular conditions.

  • Some women experience changes in their sexuality and may experience sexual problems such as loss of desire and vaginal dryness as a result of stress.

  • The effects of stress may present physically such as fatigue, aches and pains, or emotionally such anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbances. Stress affects others by causing gastrointestinal disorders such as ulcers, lower abdominal cramps, colitis, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

  • Stress weakens the immune system.

  • Stress can initiate dermatological conditions such as itchy skin, breakouts, wrinkles, and rashes.

  • Stress weakens your immunity and therefore your ability to fight off adverse food reactions.

 Impact of stress on men’s health:

  • The effects of stress may present physically such as fatigue, aches and pains, or emotionally such anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbances.

  • Stress affects others by causing gastrointestinal disorders such as ulcers, lower abdominal cramps, colitis, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). 

  • Stress weakens the immune system so people experience more colds and infections.

  • Stress can initiate dermatological conditions.      

  • Stress can impact your libido and your sexual performance.

  • Stress may be the culprit for hair loss in some men.

Are you controlling your stress or is stress controlling you? What do you do to combat stress? Leave us a comment and let us know.